Museum Lazienki Krolewski, Warschau

 

Group show in the gardens of the Lazienki Krolewski Museum, Warschau

 

Museum De Hallen, Haarlem

 

Publication of the painting 'Piëta' (collection Museum Catharijeconvent)

in the catalogue of the exhibition 'Oh Muse!', Museum De Hallen, Haarlem.

 

(Participating artists are a.o. Marc Mulders, Erzsebet Baerveldt,

Gijs Frieling, Guido Geelen, Emo Verkerk, Roy Villevoye)

 

 

Museum van Bommel van Dam

 

 

finished

Museum van Bommel van Dam

 

 

 

finished

De Nederlandse Bank, Amsterdam

 

 

 

'I'm not doing anything until I feel the need'

 

Group show at the Nederlandse Bank, Amsterdam

 

finished

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Museum van Bommel van Dam

If I'm not beside you, I'm behind you, 260-180cm
If I'm not beside you, I'm behind you, 260-180cm

 

 

 

 

'If I'm not beside you I'm behind you',

has been purchased by

Museum van Bommel van Dam

Bonnefantenmuseum

Sinner, 200-200cm
Sinner, 200-200cm

 

'Sinner' has been purchased

by the Bonnefantenmuseum, Maastricht

Interview

The White Child and the Red Sky, 160-220cm
The White Child and the Red Sky, 160-220cm

 

 

“There must be a flow of adrenaline when I'm painting, that feels good.”

 

Judith Krebbekx speaks to Saskia van Haaren     

 

 

When she is at work in her studio in Meerssen, she plays music with a stirring beat. “The subject of my paintings is quite serene as it is, I feel classical music would make it too much so. There should be a flow of adrenaline when I'm painting, that feels good.”

 

Judith Krebbekx (1967) tells of her passion for the art of painting. Three of her works were recently bought by the [Utrecht] Museum Catharijneconvent. One of them, The White Child and the Red Sky, newly graces the entrance hall of the museum. The colossal work intrigues straight away through its form and colour. It shows the Virgin Mary with the Christ child sitting on her lap. The haunting red sky in the background adds an effect of drama, reminding one of a Tuscan landscape with cypresses. It forms a great contrast with the white child in the foreground. One wonders: is the child alive or is it dead?

 

Religion as comfort

 

Even though Krebbekx often paints religious themes, she does not think of herself as religious. “I can, however, well understand people's need for religion. It gives us something to hold on to, and the idea that we are noticed. A sense of comfort.

While on a working trip in Spain she watched a procession in which a beautifully decorated image of the Virgin was carried through the town. People were in exstacy, and deeply moved. They were like children following their mother. “As a child, when you've fallen and hurt yourself, your mother gives you a kiss on the knee, but who gives you that kiss once you've grown up? Maybe this is what the function of religion is.

The idea of the Virgin is so powerful that whatever you do with the character, however you represent her, stilised, in abstract, cut out, she will continue to embody all these meanings. She is the ultimate mother and recognisable as such to everyone.”

 

Passionate about the art of painting

 

Even as a little girl Krebbekx knew that she wanted to do art school. She started out doing photography, but after two years she decided to switch to painting, which is where her passion lies. Her interest in photography does still influence her way of looking at the world. “The framing of a scene is important. It is like using a view finder on a camera. What bit do you show? What bit do you explicitly not want to show?

Sometimes the forms are literally squeezed into the frame, which may give the painting an oppressive effect.”

The difference between photography and painting is that with photography one knows the outcome beforehand, with a painting one can never be certain. “You start from an idea and during the working process an image emerges that is new to the world. It has never been created before, never been seen before, not even in my head. This is real.”

 


 

(translation by I.Bellingwout)